How Is Lung Cancer Diagnosed?

Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in both men and women—not including skin cancer—and accounts for 14 percent of all new cancers. The most common causes of lung cancer include smoking, secondhand smoke and exposure to certain toxins. However, non-smokers with a family history of lung cancer and cancer survivors who had radiation … Continued

How Common Is Cervical Cancer?

Cervical cancer was once one of the most common causes of cancer death for American women. That all changed, however, thanks to an increased use of Pap smear testing. In fact, incidence rates of cervical cancer have dropped by more than half since Pap smear testing has become an integral part of women’s wellness. All … Continued

Cervical Cancer: Everything You Need to Know

Cervical cancer is a malignant tumor located in the cervix, the lowest part of the uterus. Most cervical cancers are associated with the human papillomavirus (HPV), a sexually transmitted infection. Approximately 12,000 women in the United States will be diagnosed with cervical cancer this year. Screening for cervical cancer Cervical cancer is one of the … Continued

Prostate Cancer: Everything You Need to Know

The cure rate for prostate cancer is very high—if it’s detected and treated early. In fact, nearly 100 percent of men diagnosed and treated before the cancer has had a chance to spread will be disease-free after five years. However, prostate cancer is still a deadly disease and your risk increases with age. Men over … Continued

How to Support Your Loved Ones During Cancer Treatment

First, the diagnosis: Discovering a loved one has cancer can be shocking and upsetting for everyone. Then, the battle begins: Oncology appointments, preparing for treatment, enduring physical and emotional hurdles and more. Cancer is a test for the person receiving treatment and for his or her family, friends and caregivers. Together, you could be in … Continued

What Is a Hematologist-Oncologist and What Do They Do?

Why would someone be referred to a hematologist-oncologist? It’s most often because an abnormality was detected during a blood test. Blood is made up of four components: white blood cells, red blood cells, platelets and plasma, and each has a specific function: White blood cells fight infection Red blood cells carry oxygen from the lungs … Continued